Courses & Subjects

Subjects Available

We offer a wide range of courses for primary (age 5-11) and secondary (age 11-16 with post-16 enhancement).

Postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE)

As part of your course, you have the opportunity to study for a university-validated PGCE qualification. This is taught alongside your school placement through study sessions at our Curriculum Centre in Norwich. This qualification is gained in addition to Qualified Teacher Status. 

Fee-paying

Apply for a pioneering fee-paying programme, with bursaries or scholarships of up to £28,000 for high-priority subjects.

Secondary Chemistry (398Q)

Who is this course for?

This course is for chemists with a passion for developing a new generation of scientifically knowledgeable citizens. The words of Carl Sagan will resonate with your core values and beliefs about the function and purpose of science education: “Science is more than a body of knowledge; it is a way of thinking. We live in an age based on science and technology, and if we don’t understand it, then who’s making all the decisions about science and technology that are going to determine the kind of future our children live in?”

Candidates will come from a wide variety of experience: some straight from a Bachelors degree, Masters or PhD; some who have worked in the education sector; and others with experience in the science industry e.g. chemical engineering or pharmacology. What unites these candidates is an affiliation with the scientific community and the associated underpinning depth of chemical knowledge acquired from a scientific degree founded on a minimum of 50% chemical sciences, e.g. biochemistry, chemical physics etc.

What will I study?

The course explores the relationship between each of the science disciplines in relation to developing a student’s deeper knowledge of chemistry. An example would be the similarities and differences between energy as a concept in chemistry, biology, and physics. In doing so, we can support the students we teach in the transferability of knowledge such as ‘matter cannot be created nor destroyed’. We will ensure trainees have relevant knowledge of the English and mathematics curriculum so they can be efficient and precise teachers of science.  

Human nature drives individuals to make sense of the world around them. It is this predisposition which underpins science as a discipline but also leads to non-scientists drawing their own conclusions from their everyday experiences. These inferences can become the bedrock of an individual’s understanding of the scientific principles that govern the world. During the course trainees learn to recognise when their students possess a commonly held misconception and how as a teacher they can address these issues. There is an emphasis on how this would structure the nature of science lessons and what progress in understanding ‘looks like’.

The course provides trainees with plentiful opportunities to develop the ability to lead whole-class practical work with confidence; and deliver memorable but purposeful demonstrations in purpose-built facilities.. The role of practical work is critically evaluated with particular attention given to the use of such activities as: memorable teaching moments;  inspirational science; and the development of the scientific way of thinking. When students conduct practical work what are they actually learning? Is there progressional value in developing students' skill with apparatus such as a pipette and burette? 

How will I learn to teach chemistry well?

By joining this course you will join a collaborative professional educational community like no other. You will train alongside other chemistry trainees and be guided and supported by like-minded practitioners including your mentor and subject specialist leaders (SSLs), who have regional and national reputations in the field. You will be able to observe some of these professionals at work; to discuss with them the challenges and opportunities you experience; to learn from them and their various approaches to the discipline.

The mentors have extensive knowledge and experience of working with pupils and have taken an active, collaborative role in specifying the precise nature of the course you are following. You will have extensive opportunities to explore real examples of students' knowledge and understanding of the chemistry curriculum. These examples will form the threshold moments in your career development and enhance your developing expertise in interacting with students to maximise their knowledge of the subject. The exploration of these examples will happen through your own teaching and observation of others.

The course places a heavy emphasis on your ability to use your critical reflections of formal study and first-hand experience, experimenting with how this looks in practice and innovating to embed your own teaching style. Your personalised programme will give you the time to reflect and develop your understanding, with support from your mentor.

In addition to classroom practice, you will receive subject-based enhancement with curriculum experts who specialise in the practice of chemistry. You will explore the specific chemistry content you are expected to teach and work with your tutors to ensure you have the expected level of knowledge to teach each part of the curriculum. The course also includes the opportunity to  develop an understanding of the historical context of science teaching in the UK and evaluate these practices against a range of background research. You will use this evaluation to develop your own concepts of high-quality teaching.

Throughout the course you will develop the subject and professional knowledge to join the wider teaching community as an able practitioner, research-led, confident in practical work, and able to communicate sensitively with students from all walks of life. You will become an excellent teacher.

How much funding will I get?

Fee-paying trainees will be eligible for a bursary of £26,000 to help fund the course. You could also apply for a scholarship of £28,000. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

You could receive £32k or £34k in total - £26k as a tax-free bursary or £28k scholarship with additional payments of £6k after tax once in teaching. You’ll receive three additional early-career payments of £2k each in your second, third and fourth year of teaching - enhancements to these payments are available if you teach in specified areas in England. You must have taught in a state-funded school in England since completing your teacher training course. View the full terms and conditions.

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs - please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

Secondary English (389T)

Who is this course for?

This course is for people who understand that a command of language and a knowledge of great literature are fundamental elements of a child’s education and therefore want to train as secondary specialists in English. We are shaped by the thoughts and words of those who have come before us, and the best literature has the power to capture and transform human experience. Students require teachers who have the expertise to help them navigate and critically engage with this complex body of knowledge.

Candidates come from a wide variety of backgrounds: straight from university; from the education sector; from different professions; after having completed Masters or PhDs; from third-sector organisations. What unites these people is a shared understanding that the teaching of English is utterly essential, exciting, and valuable to secondary students.

Trainee teachers of English would usually have a degree-level qualification in English Literature. Related or combined degrees could also be considered.

We are looking for people who believe in the need for an academically rigorous training in the teaching of English, taking the subject as seriously as any Masters or PhD programme.

The rigour and demands of an academic qualification in secondary English are at the very heart of this unique course.

What will I study?

Breadth and depth

The course will aim to build broad knowledge while acknowledging that individual candidates will want to build their own areas of particular expertise. Our vision for English departments within the Trust is that they should be composed of teachers with a strong overall grasp of both the literary and the linguistic elements of the subject, alongside a deep understanding of particular topics. 

Literature through the ages

The course will focus on consolidating knowledge of the literary canon for all trainees, so that they can confidently explain the significance of texts from any era in English literature. We will examine the structure of knowledge in English and the impact this should have on our teaching and assessment. Chronology and the concept of influence within and among literary movements will be key.

Literature enables our students to break out of the present and encounter the thoughts and struggles of different ages, and we as teachers are their guides into this fascinating world which can expand their horizons so significantly. Therefore the course will focus primarily on literature from the past which has had a significant ongoing influence. This is also central to our intention of building cultural capital in our students. 

Explicit grammatical knowledge

The course will include a thorough foundation in grammatical knowledge, based on an awareness that this element of English has been neglected for many years. If it is to be revived then trainee teachers must be thoroughly knowledgeable and comfortable with grammatical concepts so that they can bring them to life for their students, not merely as dry rules but as a rich framework of ideas that shape meaning for us as readers and writers.

How will I learn to teach English well?

You will learn through professional practice and through critically reflecting on your own practice. Your school placements within the course will give you the opportunity to teach, to observe, to practise, to experiment, and to innovate. You have the opportunity to reflect upon your own practice within your school context. As a course entitlement, you will have the time to discuss this with your school-based subject mentor; you can then identify the ways in which you need to develop as a specialist and as a professional. What results is a highly personalised programme in which, through dialogue with your mentor, you develop your teaching style, practice, and ideas in a bespoke way.

You will learn through participating within a community of practitioners. A community of practitioners within Inspiration Teacher Training includes other trainees on the same course, the mentors who are themselves subject specialists, and the subject specialist leaders (SSLs) at the Inspiration Trust. Mentors and SSLs are teachers of English who have reputations at the regional and national level. As a trainee, you become part of this interconnected web of professionals, all of whom are developing and promoting the subject of English. You will have the opportunity to observe some of these professionals at work, to discuss with them the challenges and opportunities you experience, to learn from them and their various approaches to the discipline. As part of your teacher training programme, your developing classroom practice will be supported by subject studies in which you will receive subject-based enhancement with curriculum experts.

You will learn through developing your knowledge as a professional and as a subject specialist. One of the most distinctive characteristics of Inspiration Teacher Training is the value it places on the richness of knowledge. Firstly, you will deepen your knowledge within your subject specialism through wide reading of literature and literary criticism. Secondly, you will develop professional knowledge to support your subject specialism. You will survey a range of educational research which will shape your teaching practice as you develop a better understanding about learning, reading, and memory.

In these ways and others, our secondary English course will develop you as a scholarly and able practitioner, able to become a leading voice within the field. 

How much funding will I get?

Trainees will be eligible for a bursary of £12,000 to help fund the course. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs - please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

Secondary History (389Y)

Who is this course for?

There is no one model of trainee teacher at Inspiration Teacher Training. Our teachers come from a wide variety of backgrounds: some will come straight from their undergraduate degree, having known for years that teaching history is what they want to do; others will have already experienced the education sector and want to train as history teachers; others will come from the world of work who want to pursue a new career; others from postgraduate level study. Wherever they come from, they have something in common: a passion for history and a desire to pass on that passion to pupils. 

The course is designed to be intellectually stimulating, intense, challenging, and rewarding at every stage. At the end of the year, you will enter the profession confident that you have had the best possible training available. Since teaching is both an academic and creative discipline, the course aims to get the balance just right; whilst being academically rigorous it is also extremely practical.

What distinguishes us from other courses and roads into the profession is our community of subject mentors. For each trainee teacher, there will be a professional mentor in one of our schools who will have read the same journal articles, academic essays, and books as the trainee teacher. This ensures that what is learned and discussed in the seminar room is directly transferable to school the next day. Our trainee teachers know that their subject mentors are as up to date with the latest research as their subject lecturer, ensuring a strong link between the theoretical and practical.

We ensure that when you have qualified you will continue your career as part of much wider subject community, connected to professionals across the country. Our course will feature visitors who are in the forefront of history teaching today, helping our trainee teachers see beyond their classroom to become the future leaders of the teaching profession.

The rigour of our course, both in the seminar room and in school, is what makes it so distinctive.

What will I study?

Building a secure knowledge-based curriculum

It matters what pupils learn and it matters if pupils can remember what they learn. For example, if a student is given an article about Alexander the Great, and there is a reference to the importance of the Greco-Persian Wars that they discussed the previous term, then the pupils should know what is being discussed and why it is relevant. Studies show it is the disadvantaged pupil who most benefits from a knowledge-based curriculum.

Chronology

Layers of knowledge provide frameworks for pupils to navigate their way around the past, construct arguments, and pose good questions. We will help you consider how pupils’ memory works, understand how to make better use of their memory, and secure their chronological understanding.

Conceptual underpinning of the discipline

History as a discipline asks certain types of questions, framed in conceptual ways that we might call second-order concepts. These include causation, change and continuity, and diversity. The course considers in detail how these conceptual underpinnings operate and how the teacher might help pupils ask and answer such questions.

Essay writing

The course focuses on developing pupils’ literacy and language to ensure they present their ideas cogently and succinctly to produce clearly argued, well-structured extended writing. You will be expected to ensure that not only the most able but also the lower-attaining pupils can  be supported in specific ways to write extended analytical arguments.

Assessment

Responsive teaching means planning carefully what pupils will learn, how they will learn it, and how the teacher will assess that pupils have learned it. This course places great emphasis on how the teacher will use regular formative assessment to diagnose those very specific pupil needs in order to help the pupil make progress. We deliberately ensure our trainee teachers decouple formative from summative assessment, encouraging a mixed constitution of assessment while ensuring what we choose to assess is meaningful.

Direct instruction

Studies show that ‘direct instruction’ is effective in teaching pupils. The teacher deliberately teaches the pupils rather than leaving it up to them to discover the answer. Pupils only progress to the next level when they have mastered the previous one. There is a strong connection between learning to play a musical instrument and getting better at history: you practise a lot to make sure you have understood what you have been learning. We will ensure there is a constant dialogue between the teacher and pupils in the form of questions and answers, so that pupils do not switch off and the teacher knows if they are being understood.

Interpretations of the past

Pupils need to learn that the past is not something written down and handed down to successive generations in one mighty tome. The original 1991 national curriculum included ‘interpretations of history’ and it continues to feature prominently in the current curriculum. Your pupils need to understand how and why the past has been remembered differently in order to develop thoughtful conversations about how we in the present understand the past.

How will I learn to teach history well?

By reading and by doing. Most of our course is spent in schools, although not necessarily spent teaching pupils. Your in-school training programme will be highly personalised and will often vary from week to week; more time allocated one week for reading and reflecting and in another week for more teaching. You will have regular discussions with your mentor about how your reading in the seminar can help you think about how you will teach in the classroom.

You will be expected to experiment and innovate in the classroom. This will require careful thought and preparation, connecting what has been discussed in the seminars to the needs of the pupils in your classes. Your mentor will support you, advising you on additional reading and providing time for you to reflect upon and analyse the effectiveness of your practice.

History teachers never work in isolation but build upon the work of others and then contribute to that wider discussion among the profession. We will ensure that your reading of history remains up-to-date so you can join a profession that continues to reads widely and be part of that wider conversation. 

How much funding will I get?

Trainees will be eligible for a bursary of £9,000 to help fund the course. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs - please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

Secondary Maths (38B3)

Who is this course for?

This course is for those who recognise the importance of mathematics in wider society, and who therefore want to train as secondary school teachers in mathematics. Mathematicians know they can bring order when there is chaos, apply logic when there is none, and gain joy from solving problems. Learning mathematics changes how we think: it teaches us to take on challenges, embrace problems, and find the truth. Learning mathematics helps us understand the world around us.

You do not necessarily need to have a mathematics degree for the course or to have come straight from university, but you will need a degree in a subject that includes a significant amount of mathematics, which might include engineering, physics, computer science, statistics, economics, or some combinations of the natural sciences.

What will I study?

Trainees on the mathematics course will explore how students learn mathematics most effectively and how students remember what they learn. Trainees will learn what this looks like in the classroom and what this means for their pedagogy. What are the most common student misconceptions and how can these be used to teach students the correct methods? How can we teach all students at all stages the wonder of proving mathematical facts?  How can we gradually build on mathematical knowledge to facilitate problem solving, reasoning, and relational understanding?

Teaching relies on you being an expert in your subject. This course will enable you to fully understand your expertise in mathematics and communicate it to others. There will be an emphasis on understanding both the nature of mathematics and the mathematical knowledge which is essential to learn before tackling more challenging concepts. The course will consider which mathematical knowledge is important at each stage of learning. You will learn when and how to connect one topic to another in the classroom, such as by looking at the role played by basic numeracy in a lesson teaching complex algebraic proof.

How will I learn to teach mathematics well?

Through professional practice and through critically reflecting on your own practice. Your school placements within the course will give you the opportunity to teach, to observe, to practise, to experiment, and to innovate. You will have the opportunity to reflect upon your own practice within your school context. As a course entitlement, you will have the time to discuss this with your school-based subject mentor; you can then identify the ways in which you need to develop as a specialist and as a professional. What results is a highly personalised programme in which, through dialogue with your mentor, you develop your teaching style, practice, and ideas in a bespoke way.

Through participating within a community of practitioners which includes other trainees on the same course, the mentors who are themselves subject specialists, and the subject specialist leaders (SSLs) at the Inspiration Trust. Mentors and the SSLs are teachers of mathematics who have reputations at the regional and national level. As a trainee, you become part of this interconnected web of professionals, all of whom are developing and promoting the subject of mathematics. You will have the opportunity to observe some of these professionals at work, to discuss with them the challenges and opportunities you experience, to learn from them and their various approaches to the discipline. As part of your teacher training programme, your developing classroom practice will be supported by subject studies, in which you will receive subject-based enhancement with curriculum experts.

Through developing your knowledge as a professional and as a subject specialist. One of the most distinctive characteristics of Inspiration Teacher Training is the value it places on the richness of knowledge. Firstly, you will deepen your knowledge of mathematics, particularly in focusing on aspects of the subject that might not be your specialism (e.g. statistics or mechanics). Secondly, you will develop professional knowledge to support this subject specialism. You will survey a range of educational research which will shape your teaching practice as you develop a better understanding about learning, reading and memory.

In these ways and others, this course will develop you as a scholarly practitioner, able to become a leading voice within the field.

How much funding will I get?

Fee-paying trainees will be eligible for a bursary of £26,000 to help fund the course. You could also apply for a scholarship of £28,000. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

You could receive £32k or £34k in total - £26k as a tax-free bursary or £28k scholarship with additional payments of £6k after tax once in teaching. You’ll receive three additional early-career payments of £2k each in your second, third and fourth year of teaching - enhancements to these payments are available if you teach in specified areas in England. 

You must have taught in a state-funded school in England since completing your teacher training course. View the full terms and conditions.

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs - please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

Secondary Modern Foreign Languages (38B4)

 Who is this course for? 

This is a course for talented linguists who want to teach French and/or Spanish in schools. You should have a belief in the emancipatory power of languages, and how mastery over another language opens up other worlds – travel, literature, employment, culture – to those who learn them. You will have an interest in the deeper structures of language shared across different languages, and what this reveals about the way we communicate with others as humans. Trainees who follow this course have an absolute commitment to communication in all its forms. In a modern globalised world, the ability to speak a second or third language opens doors to employment across the globe. If you have this deep love of languages and you want to inspire a similar love in pupils, then this course is for you!

In order to take this course, you should either be a native speaker in the language, or have studied the language to degree level – you will need to be able to teach the language at A Level on this course. If your degree is not in the language, then you will need to demonstrate at interview that your competence, in both language and literature, is at a similar level to someone who has taken a degree in the language. We would normally expect you to have spent time in a country where the language you will be teaching is spoken.

What will I study?

In this course you will learn about language acquisition and the way in which people learn additional languages. You will study common errors and misconceptions that pupils develop, and how these can be predicted, mitigated, and overcome. You will study the grammar of your language, and what it means to study and learn grammar in the context of learning to speak a language. You will learn about different curriculum models in languages, how these are structures, and how they are assessed, including at GCSE and A Level.

How will I learn to teach languages well?

Through professional practice and through critically reflecting on your own practice. Your school placements within the course will give you the opportunity to teach, to observe, to practise, to experiment, and to innovate. You have the opportunity to reflect upon your own practice within your school context. As a course entitlement, you will have the time to discuss this with your school-based subject mentor; you can then identify the ways in which you need to develop as a specialist and as a professional. What results is a highly personalised programme in which, through dialogue with your mentor, you develop your teaching style, practice, and ideas in a bespoke way.

Through participating within a community of practitioners which includes other trainees on the same course, the mentors who are themselves subject specialists, and the subject specialist leaders (SSLs) at the Inspiration Trust. Mentors and the SSLs are teachers of languages who have reputations at the regional and national level. As a trainee, you become part of this interconnected web of professionals, all of whom are developing and promoting the subject of modern foreign languages. You will have the opportunity to observe some of these professionals at work, to discuss with them the challenges and opportunities you experience, to learn from them and their various approaches to the discipline. As part of your teacher training programme, your developing classroom practice will be supported by subject studies, in which you will receive subject-based enhancement with curriculum experts.

Through developing your knowledge as a professional and as a subject specialist. One of the most distinctive characteristics of Inspiration Teacher Training is the value it places on the richness of knowledge. Firstly, you will deepen your knowledge within your subject specialism, including of literature in your language. Secondly, you will develop professional knowledge to support your subject specialism. You will survey a range of educational research which will shape your teaching practice as you develop a better understanding about learning, reading and memory.

In these ways and others, this course will develop you as a scholarly and able practitioner, able to become a leading voice within the field.

How much funding will I get?

Fee-paying trainees will be eligible for a bursary of £26,000 to help fund the course. You could also apply for a scholarship of £28,000. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

You could receive £32k or £34k in total - £26k as a tax-free bursary or £28k scholarship with additional payments of £6k after tax once in teaching. You’ll receive three additional early-career payments of £2k each in your second, third and fourth year of teaching - enhancements to these payments are available if you teach in specified areas in England. You must have taught in a state-funded school in England since completing your teacher training course. View the full terms and conditions.

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs - please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

Secondary Physics (38B6)

Who is this course for?

This course is for passionate physicists who would like to share their subject with young people to empower them to go on to live more fulfilling lives. You may have just finished your degree, Masters, or PhD, spent time in industry, worked to some capacity in schools already, or be completing a successful career and thinking you would now like to share your experience.

Science is a fundamental part of our everyday lives, both in the way that we think and the way that we live. Our students are growing into a world of increasingly sophisticated applications of science and the vast majority of careers will involve at least some degree of scientific understanding. Physics has a particularly crucial role in our rapidly developing world; the explosive growth of our communication systems, the rapid development of new energy sources and our (desperately needed) development of more sustainable vehicles are just a few of these.

The ability to think scientifically is also necessary for students to fluently interpret the world and solve problems. Above all else, however, physics is a subject of great beauty, of simple patterns that lead to staggering outcomes. 

How will I learn to teach Physics well?

Your science studies will be led by highly experienced and inspirational tutors. We will provide you with a science specialist as a mentor on placement. Your school-based mentors will be experienced and enthusiastic science teachers. They will have read the same books and research papers that you will study and will be enthusiastic to discuss them with you. They will be with you in the classroom, guiding and advising until you are ready to take classes on your own. They will set you weekly targets and help you reflect on your practice. 

You will develop a cutting-edge approach to highly effective teaching. With a clear focus on cognitive psychology and a knowledge-rich curriculum, you will develop a teaching style that is new and highly effective. We want you centre stage, enthusing about physics, telling the students about your experience of physics. Carefully selecting the key knowledge that they need to learn and using clear explanation, carefully selected diagrams, animations, and demonstrations to gain absolute clarity in your transmission. 

We want you to lead progress in the class, using a variety of assessment techniques to ensure that everyone not only understood the purpose of the lesson but also can remember it, yesterday’s lesson, and the lessons preceding that. We would like you to be a curator of your students' scientific knowledge, to build it with care and passion to the point that they can apply it to demanding scientific problems. We would like you to lead your students to learn science beyond the dry demands of an exam board; to give them a passion for progressing to A Level and degree studies, or to go out into the world and use their science in unique and useful ways.

You will develop your ability to ask and answer questions. Strong physics teaching involves identifying and addressing misconceptions. A question such as ‘Why does the moon appear to change shape?’ will produce a wide range of answers and lay the foundations for addressing key misconceptions. We will also explore some examples of the types of questions the students are likely to ask you, such as ‘What actually is energy?’, ‘How can atoms be mainly empty space when this table feels so solid?’, and ‘How can we travel to other solar systems?’ It is these ‘out of the blue’ questions that will allow you to pass on the symmetry and beauty of your subject.

You will learn to lead highly effective class practicals and demonstrations. Well-planned practicals will ensure that students can explore and extend their understanding safely, with passion and precision. You will be trained in a purpose-built lab before taking your skills out to the placement schools, developing a confident and effective approach to classic physics demonstrations and experiments. You will also explore the appropriate use of data loggers, student response systems, and computer-based animations and simulations.

Throughout the course you will develop the subject and professional knowledge to join the wider teaching community as an able practitioner, research-led, confident in practical work, and able to communicate sensitively with students from all walks of life. You will become an excellent teacher.

How much funding will I get?

Fee-paying trainees will be eligible for a bursary of £26,000 to help fund the course. You could also apply for a scholarship of £28,000. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

You could receive £32k or £34k in total - £26k as a tax-free bursary or £28k scholarship with additional payments of £6k after tax once in teaching. You’ll receive three additional early-career payments of £2k each in your second, third and fourth year of teaching - enhancements to these payments are available if you teach in specified areas in England. You must have taught in a state-funded school in England since completing your teacher training course. View the full terms and conditions.

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs - please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

 

Primary General (389L)

Primary 

All our primary trainees train in a particular subject specialism. We offer specialist subjects of English, natural sciences, or humanities to trainees on this course. You can choose your specialism once you have been accepted. However, if you want to train as a maths specialist, we offer a specific Primary with Maths route. 

Who is this course for?

Our primary courses are designed to train you to teach in a primary school. Primary school teachers usually have one class of pupils to whom they teach all subjects. Our primary course therefore places strong emphasis on building up your expertise in all of the subjects that you will teach, from Geography and History to English and PE.

Primary teachers on our course have a thirst and passion for knowledge which they seek to share with children, and they want to play a crucial role in a child’s upbringing. 

What will I study?

All primary trainees study the subjects of the National Curriculum as part of the course. Some of this will be taught in our Curriculum Centre and some will be taught in schools. It is not possible to master all the subjects you have to teach in your primary year, but you will get a decent introduction to each one and a number of chances to practise teaching each subject.

Early in the course you will have an intensive focus on teaching phonics. Learning phonics is a crucial stage in learning to read well, and getting this right at an early stage in primary school is of the utmost importance. The same is true of basic numeracy as young children as young children need to learn their number bonds before they can do more complex mathematics. You will learn about different methods of teaching numeracy, the misunderstandings that children often have, and how you can address these.

In the first term you will focus on building breadth across the different subjects you will teach and in the second term you will focus in depth on your specialist subject. As part of this you will have focused training in that subject area, and complete a project in your placement school on teaching your specialism.

You will also receive training on Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) so that you can better understand and plan for the specific challenges that some children face. You will study these needs and disabilities in great detail during your course and learn about the sorts of strategies that experienced teachers to meet those needs. You will also learn how to work with a teaching assistant. 

How will I learn to teach well?

Through professional practice and through critically reflecting on your own practice, you will learn to teach well. Your school placements will give you the opportunity to teach, to observe, to practise, to experience, and to innovate. You will have opportunities to reflect upon your own practice. In discussions with your school-based subject mentor, you will be supported to identify the ways you need to develop as a specialist and as a professional. Your training programme will be highly personalised so that, throughout the course, you can develop your teaching style, practice and ideas in a bespoke way.

As a primary trainee, you will be part of a community of practitioners which will include other trainees, your mentor, teachers in your placement schools, the primary phase leaders at our Curriculum Centre, and our subject specialist leaders. 

Is there financial help?

You may be able to apply for a student loan to help pay your tuition fee or living costs. Please visit www.gov.uk/student-finance for further information.

If you are applying for Primary with Maths, as a fee-paying trainee you may be eligible for a bursary of £6,000 to help fund the course, as long as you have A Level maths at grade B or above. You can find more information about funding and bursaries on the UCAS website and Get Into Teaching.

Primary Maths (389H)

(389H) 

Secondary: religion, world views and philosophy (38B9)

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